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Posts tagged: art

Rebel Eight - Spring 2013
Emanuel Isidro

Rebel Eight - Spring 2013

Emanuel Isidro

The inexorable consistency and internal logic of his solutions hint at a larger conceptual principle, which is outlined in great depth in the artist’s extensive theoretical writings. Like many pioneers of abstraction, Mondrian’s impetus was largely spiritual. He aimed to distill the real world to its pure essence, to represent the dichotomies of the universe in eternal tension. To achieve this, he privileged certain principles—stability, universality, and spirituality—through the yin/yang balancing of horizontal and vertical strokes. His philosophical framework was grounded in the Neoplatonic and Tantric-inspired texts of authors connected to the Theosophical Society, the Dutch branch of which had counted Mondrian as a member since 1909.

about Piet Mondrian - Jennifer Blessing

 Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

Tableau No. 2/Composition No. VII - Piet Mondrian , (1913)
41.38” x 45” oil on canvas - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
When Mondrian saw Cubist paintings by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso at a 1911 exhibition in Amsterdam, he was inspired to go to Paris. Tableau No. 2/Composition No. VII, painted a year after his arrival in 1912, exemplifies Mondrian’s regard for the new technique. With a procedure indebted to high Analytic Cubism, Mondrian broke down his motif—in this case a tree—into a scaffolding of interlocking black lines and planes of color; furthermore, his palette of close-valued ocher and gray tones resembles Cubist canvases. Yet Mondrian went beyond the Parisian Cubists’ degree of abstraction: his subjects are less recognizable, in part because he eschewed any suggestion of volume, and, unlike the Cubists, who rooted their compositions at the bottom of the canvas in order to depict a figure subject to gravity, Mondrian’s scaffolding fades at the painting’s edges. In works such as Composition 8, based on studies of Parisian building façades, Mondrian went even further in his refusal of illusionism and the representation of volume. 
- Jennifer Blessing (excerpt)
Full Article

Tableau No. 2/Composition No. VII - Piet Mondrian , (1913)

41.38” x 45” oil on canvas - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

When Mondrian saw Cubist paintings by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso at a 1911 exhibition in Amsterdam, he was inspired to go to Paris. Tableau No. 2/Composition No. VII, painted a year after his arrival in 1912, exemplifies Mondrian’s regard for the new technique. With a procedure indebted to high Analytic Cubism, Mondrian broke down his motif—in this case a tree—into a scaffolding of interlocking black lines and planes of color; furthermore, his palette of close-valued ocher and gray tones resembles Cubist canvases. Yet Mondrian went beyond the Parisian Cubists’ degree of abstraction: his subjects are less recognizable, in part because he eschewed any suggestion of volume, and, unlike the Cubists, who rooted their compositions at the bottom of the canvas in order to depict a figure subject to gravity, Mondrian’s scaffolding fades at the painting’s edges. In works such as Composition 8, based on studies of Parisian building façades, Mondrian went even further in his refusal of illusionism and the representation of volume.

- Jennifer Blessing (excerpt)

Full Article

Daniel Danger

Daniel Danger

Good Morning San Francisco, Prickly Pals Series - Jason Licht

Good Morning San Francisco, Prickly Pals Series - Jason Licht

Rusted Face - C215

Courtesy of The Dirt Floor

Rusted Face - C215

Courtesy of The Dirt Floor

iheartmyart:

Gamaliel Rodriguez, The Astmatic Puppet, Household gloss enamel on canvas. 72” by 54”, Series: “Ads”, 2007 

iheartmyart:

Gamaliel Rodriguez, The Astmatic Puppet, Household gloss enamel on canvas. 72” by 54”, Series: “Ads”, 2007 

urhajos:

‘Depressive Superheroes’ series by Lora8

urhajos:

Depressive Superheroes’ series by Lora8

artpropelled:

John Bonick

artpropelled:

John Bonick

23rd-block:

Joseba Eskubi, Insomnia. 2011.

23rd-block:

Joseba Eskubi, Insomnia. 2011.